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Hunting season heats up: Slow start blamed on warm temperatures

December 5, 2011 Leave a comment

PUBLISHED IN THE CENTRE DAILY TIMES

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2011

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BY ED MAHON

Chris Caldana, 22, and his younger brother, 16-year-old Jarred, hiked along Spring Creek on Monday.

They heard a single gunshot to their left, up a steep hill that they had scaled earlier in the morning but didn’t plan to climb again.

“Someone might’ve got one,” said the younger brother.

The Caldanas weren’t so lucky Monday. The brothers from Snow Show took to the woods along with thousands of other hunters for the first day of deer rifle hunting season.

They had spotted some doe, but hadn’t seen any bucks they judged to be big enough to shoot at. They figured that the warm weather, with temperatures reaching into the high 60s, was partially to blame.

It meant more ticks were around to latch on to their legs, necks and arms as they sat in the woods, they said. And it meant there were fewer deer walking around those woods.

“They ain’t moving like they usually do. They’re just lying down,” said Chris Caldana. “They ain’t dumb.”

Read more: Hunting season heats up.

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Categories: Features, November 2011

After scandal, PSU plays on

December 5, 2011 Leave a comment

 

Caption: A child in the stands holds a sign supporting Joe Paterno. Penn State lost to Nebraska 14-17 November 12, 2011. Nabil K. Mark

PUBLISHED IN THE CENTRE DAILY TIMES

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2011

BY CURTIS TATE, MIKE DAWSON AND ED MAHON

UNIVERSITY PARK — A clear, sunny afternoon brightened the somber mood Saturday at Beaver Stadium, as Penn State played Nebraska in the last home game of the season — and the first in 46 years without Joe Paterno as head football coach.

While mixed feelings prevailed about the circumstances that led to Paterno’s absence, one sentiment was universal: Justice for the alleged victims of former assistant coach Jerry Sandusky is more important than the university’s football program or its reputation.

“Penn State is about more than football, Joe Paterno and this scandal,” said Cliff Plank, who graduated from the university’s architecture program in 2010.

While hardly any of Beaver Stadium’s 107,000 seats sat empty, the week-old scandal that resulted in the dismissal of Paterno and President Graham Spanier hung over the game. Penn State students wore blue shirts to call attention to child sexual abuse.

Sandusky been has charged with sexually abusing at least eight boys over a 15-year period, and a grand jury presentment shows that many people had direct or indirect knowledge of it but failed to report it, including Paterno, university officials and others.

Tailgater Chris Cherinka, of Dunmore, said the focus shouldn’t be on Paterno.

“We’re worried more about Paterno than who the real criminal is,” he said.

Several victims’ rights advocacy groups rallied at Beaver Stadium before and during the game. A few students, including Adam Lloyd, sold blue bracelets for $1, with proceeds going toward the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network.

“We just want to support the victims,” he said. “At the end of the day, that’s why we’re here. Everything else is trivial compared to what happened to them.”
Read more: After scandal, PSU plays on.

Man’s protest of PSU game draws mixed reactions

December 5, 2011 Leave a comment

PUBLISHED IN THE CENTRE DAILY TIMES

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2011

BY ED MAHON

UNIVERSITY PARK — John Matko put black tape over his cap’s Penn State logo.

He carried two hand-written signs that, at different points Saturday, prompted mockery, anger and sympathy from some of the thousands of fans who walked by him.

“The kids are what this day is about … not who wins or loses, or who lost their jobs and how!” Matko wrote on one of the signs. “Honor the abused kids by canceling the game and season now!”

Matko, 34, graduated from Penn State in 2000 and now lives in Pittsburgh where he does physical therapy work at a chiropractor’s office. He left his Pittsburgh home at 5:30 a.m. Saturday.

By noon, Matko said one fan spilled beer on him and some others had knocked down his signs. One tried to debate Matko and called him an idiot when Matko walked away.

But some had compliments.

“Very nice,” one woman said after reading the sign for a minute. Another gave him a high five, and another shook his hand, saying he was an educator and appreciated the message.

Read more: Man’s protest of PSU game draws mixed reactions.

Second Mile, PSU had land deal in 2002

November 21, 2011 Leave a comment

 

Caption: There is no construction Monday, November 14, 2011 at the site of the new Second Mile learning center in Patton Township. Nabil K. Mark 

PUBLISHED IN THE CENTRE DAILY TIMES

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2011

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BY ED MAHON

STATE COLLEGE — Penn State sold about 40.7 acres of undeveloped land to The Second Mile for $168,500 in April 2002.

The price is what Penn State says it paid for the land in August 1999 — and about $151,500 less than what a Pittsburgh man paid for it in 1990.

Penn State originally purchased the 40.7 acres of land as part of a much larger purchase.

“The property was acquired by the university to provide the opportunity for university use, but if the property was considered not of strategic importance to the university, other community uses were definite possibilities,” Daniel Sieminski, Penn State’s associate vice president for finance and business, said in an email Tuesday.

The land sale is another example of the close relationship between the two organizations, which are both embroiled in a child sex abuse scandal because of allegations against former Penn State assistant football coach and The Second Mile founder Jerry Sandusky.

Athletes and coaches with ties to Penn State were frequently the featured players at the annual Second Mile Celebrity Golf Classic. The event was the largest annual fundraiser for The Second Mile, and it raised $240,000 in 2009, according to IRS tax forms.

In the nonprofit’s 2009 annual report, the Penn State Altoona campus and the Penn State Professional Management Association donated between $2,000 and $4,999 to The Second Mile.

The Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center donated between $1,000 and $1,999.

Several of the nonprofit’s major individual donors have ties to the university. For example, Lloyd Huck, a Penn State trustee emeritus, and his wife, Dorothy, are listed as members of the Arthur C. and Evelyn M. Sandusky Society, a designation for honored Second Mile donors.

The Second Mile, a charity in crisis, may not recover

November 21, 2011 Leave a comment

Caption: The Second Mile charity offices are located at 1402 S. Atherton St., December 2, 2011. Nabil K. Mark 

PUBLISHED IN THE CENTRE DAILY TIMES

FRIDAY NOVEMBER 11, 2011

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BY ED MAHON

Guidance counselors in the State College Area schools have stopped referring students to The Second Mile’s early intervention youth programs.

Educators in the Bald Eagle Area, for now at least, don’t plan to hand out trading cards, with positive messages and the images of Penn State football players, that the organization distributes.

And whether a significant number of schools will continue to participate in the nonprofit’s leadership conferences is one of many uncertainties.

“We don’t know the status of that organization going forward,” said Dena Cipriano, spokeswoman for the Philipsburg- Osceola Area School District.

The future of The Second Mile has come into question since the Attorney General’s Office released a grand jury report Saturday, alleging that the organization’s founder,

Jerry Sandusky, sexually abused eight boys over 15 years. The report said he was introduced to the boys through The Second Mile programs.

Some educators said they felt betrayed by the news.

“I have been a public school teacher for 23 years. During that time I have referred many children to The Second Mile,” Bellefonte resident Susan Munnell wrote in a letter to the Centre Daily Times. “It makes me sick to now know that I could have been throwing them to the wolves — wolves that prey on innocent, at-risk children seeking acceptance and positive role models.”

Others cautioned against punishing an entire organization because of accusations against one person.

“We’re not going to paint everyone with the same brush,” said Penns Valley Area School District Superintendent Brian Griffith.

“For the Record” features information on State College Area School Board candidates

November 21, 2011 Leave a comment

PUBLISHED AT CENTREDAILY.COM

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2011

Eight candidates are competing for five seats on the State College Area school board.

In “For the Record” blog posts, CDT reporter Ed Mahon offers some more information on who each of the candidates are, where they stand on some key issues, and what their priorities are.

Linked are the eight stories, along with an introduction and this week’s story on the status of a high school building project.

For more information the CDT Voters Guide, which was published in Saturday’s paper, will be available later this week on the website.

Read more: “For the Record” features information on State College Area School Board candidates.

Blues, folk festival to benefit HOPE Fund

November 21, 2011 Leave a comment

PUBLISHED IN THE CENTRE DAILY TIMES

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2011

BY ED MAHON

Guy Davis once took on the role of Robert Johnson — the famous blues musician, who according to legend, met the devil at a crossroads near a Mississippi plantation and traded his soul for great musical talent.

“Guy Davis, who plays the title role, is both a musician and an actor. He sings a selection of John-son’s songs (including “Crossroads Blues” and “Hellhound on My Trail”), strumming his guitar with a twanginess that makes it sound as if the music is jumping right out of the box,” a theater reviewer for The New York Times wrote in 1993, describing the off-Broadway production “Robert Johnson: Trick the Devil” about the American bluesman who died in 1938.

Davis will be one of the performers at this year’s 4th annual Harry Smith Festival, which will take place 2 to 6 p.m. Sunday at the Elk Creek Cafe and Aleworks in Millheim.